Updates

We’re cracking down on Texas’ worst polluters.

Our Texas Clean Air Project won landmark settlements on behalf of Environment Texas members against Shell Oil in 2009 and Chevron Phillips in 2010, after the companies agreed to halt illegal emissions and pay millions in fines. Now, as ExxonMobil releases millions of pounds in excess pollution at its Baytown facility, we’re using the same legal strategy to demand compliance with the law.

Report | Environment America

America’s Next Top Polluter

Tyson Foods, Inc. is “one of the world’s largest producers of meat and poultry.” The company’s pollution footprint includes manure from its contract growers’ factory farm operations, fertilizer runoff from grain grown to feed the livestock it brings to market as meat, and waste from its processing plants.

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News Release | Environment America

Clean water wins as Congress rejects budget rider

Due to overwhelming public support, the Clean Water Rule has now withstood every attack that polluters could muster in Congress - the Barrasso bill, the CRA measure, and now an attempted budget rider.  Polluters and their allies have played all their dirty water cards in Congress and lost.   

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News Release | Environment Texas

Environment Texas hails new EPA clean air standards, points to wind energy as way forward

HOUSTON – Environment Texas applauded a new clean air standard finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today, saying the rule will help protect public health and restore the magnificent views in Big Bend National Park. The group said expanded use of wind energy can help the state comply with the rule, reducing haze and carbon pollution.

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Report | Environment Texas

Turning to the Wind

Wind power continues to grow as a source of clean energy across America. The United States generated 26 times more electricity from wind power in 2014 than it did in 2001.

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Headline

Luke Metzger and Sara Smith: The unacceptable inundation of our water infrastructure

More than 630,000 gallons of raw sewage overflowed across Dallas recently as the result of record-setting rains.

The sheer volume of stormwater transmitted by roads and parking lots into sewers overwhelmed the capacity of the system and sewage was released across five Dallas locations.

Unfortunately, this wasn’t an isolated incident — there are more than 40,000 sewer overflows every year in the United States.

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