Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

Blog Post

This isn’t your normal Earth Day. Make it your most impactful. | Ross Sherman

Ideas for action during a challenging time for our environment.

 

 

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

Cities can lead the solar energy revolution | Bret Fanshaw

Without federal clean energy leadership, local governments will need to pick up the slack.

> Keep Reading
Headline

Get the lead out (of water) in Texas

After nearly three years of grappling with contaminated drinking water, the residents of Flint, Michigan, finally obtained some relief as a federal court approved a settlement last week mandating replacement of lead pipes. However, lead in drinking water is not unique to Flint, and we must confront the sobering need to “get the lead out” here in Texas as well.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

UT Faculty Urge University Lands to Reduce Methane Pollution

AUSTIN – Faculty of the University of Texas System released a letter today urging UT Chancellor McRaven to reduce the climate-damaging methane emissions occurring at oil and gas facilities on land managed by the UT System. The letter has more than 177 faculty signatures and ran as an ad in the Wednesday edition of UT Austin’s student newspaper, The Daily Texan. “UT wants us to be leaders for our students,” said David Matiella of UT San Antonio’s Department of Architecture. The professors who signed onto this letter want UT to step up and be a leader on managing our public lands.”

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

2016 air pollution data for Texas | Luke Metzger

Today we released Our Health at Risk: Why Are Millions of Americans Still Breathing Unhealthy Air?, which examines air pollution data for 2015. We also obtained preliminary data from the EPA for 2016 (the data will officially be considered final on May 1, but we expect few if any changes). So how did Texas metro areas stack up? In general, air pollution improved in Texas in 2016, with a few exceptions. There were more smoggy days in Houston and more sooty days in El Paso, Brownsville and McAllen (increases italicized below).

> Keep Reading

Pages