Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Raw Sewage Released by Hurricane Harvey

Reports indicate that flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey spilled at least 31 million gallons of raw sewage in Texas, but likely spilled far more.1 That’s the equivalent of every person in Houston flushing a toilet seven times.* This pollution threatens human health.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Dealing with Debris From Hurricane Harvey

The floodwaters of Hurricane Harvey have receded, but the work to clean up in the storm’s aftermath has just begun. One thing left in Harvey’s wake is a tremendous amount of debris -- people’s belongings and furniture, parts of buildings, trees, and boats destroyed during the hurricane

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Get the Lead Out "Back to School" Toolkit

Our children need safe drinking water – especially at school where they go to learn and play each day. Unfortunately, lead is contaminating drinking water at schools and preschools across the country. The problem stems from pipes, plumbing, faucets and fixtures that contain lead. The common-sense solution is to “get the lead out” of schools’ water delivery systems. This “Back to School” toolkit designed to help parents, teachers and school officials get the facts on lead in drinking water and make the case for strong local action to ensure safe drinking water at school.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

71% of Texas schools test positive for lead in drinking water

AUSTIN – 779 Texas schools have found lead in their drinking water, according to an analysis of testing data by Environment Texas. The analysis, an update of one completed in March, includes hundreds of additional tests from Austin, Houston, Humble, Alief, Garland and Northwest Independent School Districts. Environment Texas also offered a new toolkit to help parents, teachers, and administrators Get the Lead Out of schools’ drinking water.  Citing a lack of accurate information on lead contamination in water and how schools should prevent it, Environment Texas encouraged parents and teachers to put the new toolkit on their “back to school” reading list.

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Blog Post

San Antonio approves higher stormwater fees to help fight flooding, pollution | Brian Zabcik

Today, Environment Texas' Kern Williams delivered the following comments to the San Antonio city council in support of proposed, higher fees for stormwater:

"We support this increase in the city's stormwater utility fee. It pays for essential drainage infrastructure for the city. The fee is also valuable because it's calculated on a property's impervious cover. Properties with more impervious cover pay higher fees. This is fair, because more impervious cover produces more stormwater runoff that flows into the city's stormwater drainage system. Properties that create more work for the system should pay more to support it.

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