Updates

Alliance Launched To Save Bees

Sixty-five chefs, restaurant owners and other culinary leaders joined us to launch the Bee Friendly Food Alliance. Through the Alliance, chefs and restaurateurs are calling attention to the importance of bees to our food supply, the dramatic die-off of bee populations, and the need to protect our pollinators. LEARN MORE.

Blog Post

San Antonio approves higher stormwater fees to help fight flooding, pollution | Brian Zabcik

Today, Environment Texas' Kern Williams delivered the following comments to the San Antonio city council in support of proposed, higher fees for stormwater:

"We support this increase in the city's stormwater utility fee. It pays for essential drainage infrastructure for the city. The fee is also valuable because it's calculated on a property's impervious cover. Properties with more impervious cover pay higher fees. This is fair, because more impervious cover produces more stormwater runoff that flows into the city's stormwater drainage system. Properties that create more work for the system should pay more to support it.

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Report

FACT SHEET: Environmental and Health Concerns About Oil and Gas Spills After Hurricane Harvey

Texas’ oil and gas regulator, the Railroad Commission of Texas, has received reports of spilled oil, gas, and other fluids from at least 20 locations, involving thousands of barrels of oil and produced water. We may never know the full impacts of these spills, but here’s what we know now.

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News Release | Environment Texas

San Antonio places 2nd in new Texas stormwater survey

SAN ANTONIO — Hurricane Harvey has shown the need for better stormwater strategies in Texas, and one of the most promising is green infrastructure. Environment Texas and Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance today released a new report, Texas Stormwater Scorecard, that ranks the state’s five biggest cities on their support for green infrastructure. While San Antonio placed second, its score of 65% shows that the city can improve its policies.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Texas Stormwater Scorecard

Rain is one of Texas’s greatest resources, but it also causes some of our most serious problems. Too much produces flooding and erosion, too little produces droughts and aquifer depletion, and dirty runoff produces water pollution. These problems are becoming worse as more of the state’s land is covered with buildings and roads that prevent rain from soaking into the ground where it falls. That’s why more Texans are using building and landscaping features that can retain and reuse stormwater onsite.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Harvey likely caused millions of gallons of sewage overflows in Houston

At least 12 sewage overflows in the Houston area have been reported since Hurricane Harvey hit, according to Environment Texas, a statewide nonprofit advocacy group. Volume amounts have yet to reported. But given that up to 2 million gallons of sewage have been released in previous storms with only 10 inches of rain or less, Hurricane Harvey’s much higher rainfall amounts should be expected to cause millions of gallons in sewage overflows.

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