Updates

Keystone XL approval is wrong direction

By facilitating the transportation of dirty tar sands fuels, Keystone would add 27.4 million metric tons of global warming pollution to our atmosphere per year. President Trump's executive order advancing the Keystone XL pipeline is definitely a step in the wrong direction. READ MORE.

News Release | Environment Texas

San Antonio places 2nd in new Texas stormwater survey

SAN ANTONIO — Hurricane Harvey has shown the need for better stormwater strategies in Texas, and one of the most promising is green infrastructure. Environment Texas and Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance today released a new report, Texas Stormwater Scorecard, that ranks the state’s five biggest cities on their support for green infrastructure. While San Antonio placed second, its score of 65% shows that the city can improve its policies.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Texas Stormwater Scorecard

Rain is one of Texas’s greatest resources, but it also causes some of our most serious problems. Too much produces flooding and erosion, too little produces droughts and aquifer depletion, and dirty runoff produces water pollution. These problems are becoming worse as more of the state’s land is covered with buildings and roads that prevent rain from soaking into the ground where it falls. That’s why more Texans are using building and landscaping features that can retain and reuse stormwater onsite.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Harvey likely caused millions of gallons of sewage overflows in Houston

At least 12 sewage overflows in the Houston area have been reported since Hurricane Harvey hit, according to Environment Texas, a statewide nonprofit advocacy group. Volume amounts have yet to reported. But given that up to 2 million gallons of sewage have been released in previous storms with only 10 inches of rain or less, Hurricane Harvey’s much higher rainfall amounts should be expected to cause millions of gallons in sewage overflows.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Petrochemical facilities release more than two million pounds of pollution during Hurricane Harvey

As Houston’s sweeping petrochemical industry shuts down because of tropical storm Harvey, it is releasing more than 2 million pounds of harmful pollution into the air, according to its initial reports to Texas regulators. The shutdowns include the Houston-area refineries of Exxon Mobil, Petrobras and Shell, as well as Chevron Phillips’ Cedar Bayou petrochemical complex.

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Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Get the Lead Out

Over the past two years, the tragedy of Flint, Michigan has stunned the nation. We watched the drinking water of an entire city become contaminated with lead. And now we know this toxic threat extends well beyond Flint to communities across the country. In fact, test results now show that lead is even contaminating drinking water in schools and pre-schools — flowing from thousands of fountains and faucets where our kids drink water every day.

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