Updates

We’re cracking down on Texas’ worst polluters.

Our Texas Clean Air Project won landmark settlements on behalf of Environment Texas members against Shell Oil in 2009 and Chevron Phillips in 2010, after the companies agreed to halt illegal emissions and pay millions in fines. Now, as ExxonMobil releases millions of pounds in excess pollution at its Baytown facility, we’re using the same legal strategy to demand compliance with the law.

Blog Post

Cities can lead the solar energy revolution | Bret Fanshaw

Without federal clean energy leadership, local governments will need to pick up the slack.

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Headline

Get the lead out (of water) in Texas

After nearly three years of grappling with contaminated drinking water, the residents of Flint, Michigan, finally obtained some relief as a federal court approved a settlement last week mandating replacement of lead pipes. However, lead in drinking water is not unique to Flint, and we must confront the sobering need to “get the lead out” here in Texas as well.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

UT Faculty Urge University Lands to Reduce Methane Pollution

AUSTIN – Faculty of the University of Texas System released a letter today urging UT Chancellor McRaven to reduce the climate-damaging methane emissions occurring at oil and gas facilities on land managed by the UT System. The letter has more than 177 faculty signatures and ran as an ad in the Wednesday edition of UT Austin’s student newspaper, The Daily Texan. “UT wants us to be leaders for our students,” said David Matiella of UT San Antonio’s Department of Architecture. The professors who signed onto this letter want UT to step up and be a leader on managing our public lands.”

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Blog Post

2016 air pollution data for Texas | Luke Metzger

Today we released Our Health at Risk: Why Are Millions of Americans Still Breathing Unhealthy Air?, which examines air pollution data for 2015. We also obtained preliminary data from the EPA for 2016 (the data will officially be considered final on May 1, but we expect few if any changes). So how did Texas metro areas stack up? In general, air pollution improved in Texas in 2016, with a few exceptions. There were more smoggy days in Houston and more sooty days in El Paso, Brownsville and McAllen (increases italicized below).

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News Release | Environment Texas

Houston’s health at risk with 107 dirty air days in 2016

HOUSTON – Preliminary data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency shows that Houston experienced an uptick in unhealthy smog days in 2016, increasing the risk of asthma attacks and other health problems. The finding comes as President Trump and a Texas lawmaker have begun separate efforts to weaken air quality protections.

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