Updates

We’re cracking down on Texas’ worst polluters.

Our Texas Clean Air Project won landmark settlements on behalf of Environment Texas members against Shell Oil in 2009 and Chevron Phillips in 2010, after the companies agreed to halt illegal emissions and pay millions in fines. Now, as ExxonMobil releases millions of pounds in excess pollution at its Baytown facility, we’re using the same legal strategy to demand compliance with the law.

News Release | Environment Texas

Texas solar capacity grew 62% in 2015

AUSTIN – Texas installed 207 megawatts (MW) of solar electric capacity in 2015 - a 62% increase – and ranked 10th in the nation for cumulative solar installed, according to a new report released by Environment Texas and the Sierra Club. Electric grid operator ERCOT projects Texas will add as much as 27,200 MW of solar in the next fifteen years, but the groups said anti-solar policies and efforts to prop up failing coal-fired power plants could jeopardize this growth.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Lighting the Way IV

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Blog Post

Biggest bike lanes investment in Austin history | Luke Metzger

Last month, the Austin City Council tentatively approved a $720 million mobility bond to invest in Austin’s transportation infrastructure. The bond includes $500 million for corridor improvement projects and $120 million for road, sidewalk, bike and transit infrastructure. Bike Austin has called the $20 million reserved for protected bike lanes and $55 million for sidewalks the biggest investment in bike and pedestrian projects in Austin’s history.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Tyson among top water polluters in Texas

HOUSTON – Tyson Foods, one of the world’s largest meat and poultry producers, generates the most animal manure of major companies surveyed nationwide, a new report said today. The Environment Texas Research & Policy Center study documented pollution from Tyson and four other major agriculture conglomerates, responsible for 44 percent of the pork, chicken, and beef produced in the U.S.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Corporate Agribusiness and the Fouling of America’s Waterways

Pollution from agribusiness is responsible for some of America’s most intractable water quality problems – including the “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie, and the pollution of countless streams and lakes with nutrients, bacteria, sediment and pesticides. Today’s agribusiness practices – from the  concentration of thousands of animals and their waste in small feedlots to the massive planting of chemical-intensive crops such as corn – make water pollution from agribusiness both much more likely and much more dangerous.

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