Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

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2014 will be big for Texas environment

This is already shaping up to be a big year for Texas’ environment. Decisions are about to be made that will have a major impact on air quality, the Gulf Coast and Texas rivers.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Dallas effectively bans fracking

DALLAS – The Dallas City Council approved a tough new ordinance today which effectively bans drilling within city limits. The new standards require drilling rigs and compressor stations to be set back 1500 feet from protected areas like homes and schools. The new buffer is five times greater than the old standard of just 300 feet and is one of the strongest in Texas. Working with local groups, Environment Texas campaigned for years in support of the ordinance, testifying before city council and issuing email action alerts to generate comments to council. 

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Environmental Group In Texas Watches SCOTUS Decision On EPA Pollution Rules

“A lot of pollution travels across state lines,” says Luke Metzger, Director of Environment Texas, “and impacts the health of other citizens of the United States. A few years back [the EPA] proposed new standards that would require some of the biggest sources of air-pollution, dirty power plants, to control [their emissions].”

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Legal Hammer Spurs Cleaner Skies

"We routinely heard that many of these upsets were out of their control, and that we would have to live with it," said Luke Metzger, director of Environment Texas. "But that's not true. If they can spend the time and money, they can reduce emissions."

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Area State Representative Backing Away From Fight Against Plastic Bag Ordinances

Rachel Stone, an attorney at the Austin-based Environment Texas, said the organization is thrilled the Alamo City is considering the ban. “Environment Texas applauds Councilman Medina for taking leadership on these important issues,” Stone said in a statement. “San Antonio made a commitment to take strides towards a more sustainable future, and it is exciting to see the city forging ahead on that path.”

Luke Metzger, director of Environment Texas, said he is glad Springer is giving up the bag ban fight. “I think it’s great,” Metzger said. “We think cities should have the right to decide what is best for them, and plastic bags have become a major problem … they are polluting our rivers, creating blight in neighborhoods and it costs the taxpayers to keep their communities clean.”

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