Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

News Release | Environment Texas

Environment Texas hails new EPA clean air standards, points to wind energy as way forward

HOUSTON – Environment Texas applauded a new clean air standard finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today, saying the rule will help protect public health and restore the magnificent views in Big Bend National Park. The group said expanded use of wind energy can help the state comply with the rule, reducing haze and carbon pollution.

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Report | Environment Texas

Turning to the Wind

Wind power continues to grow as a source of clean energy across America. The United States generated 26 times more electricity from wind power in 2014 than it did in 2001.

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Headline

Luke Metzger and Sara Smith: The unacceptable inundation of our water infrastructure

More than 630,000 gallons of raw sewage overflowed across Dallas recently as the result of record-setting rains.

The sheer volume of stormwater transmitted by roads and parking lots into sewers overwhelmed the capacity of the system and sewage was released across five Dallas locations.

Unfortunately, this wasn’t an isolated incident — there are more than 40,000 sewer overflows every year in the United States.

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Blog Post

Stop the dam assault on our rivers and wildlife | Russell Bassett

Rivers and streams are the arteries and veins of our land and communities, few things have impacted our rivers more than dams. The hydropower industry is right now making an unprecedented assault on our rivers and wildlife. If they’re successful, they’ll take the nation back more than half a century to the regrettable time when dams could destroy our rivers without consequence.

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Headline

Metzger, Smith: Our water infrastructure isn't up to task to handle pollution

Last month, more than 2 million gallons of raw sewage overflowed across Houston, the result of Halloween weekend rains swamping the sewage system.

The sheer volume of stormwater transmitted by roads and parking lots into sewers overwhelmed the capacity of the system and sewage was released to nearby bayous and ultimately to Galveston Bay.

Unfortunately, this wasn't an isolated incident - there are more than 40,000 sewer overflows every year in the United States. These events, along with other pollution picked up by stormwater, contribute to 80 percent of the major waterways in Greater Houston not being safe for swimming or fishing.

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