Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Raw Sewage Released by Hurricane Harvey

Reports indicate that flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey spilled at least 31 million gallons of raw sewage in Texas, but likely spilled far more.1 That’s the equivalent of every person in Houston flushing a toilet seven times.* This pollution threatens human health.

San Antonio approves higher stormwater fees to help fight flooding, pollution

By | Brian Zabcik
Clean Air & Clean Water Advocate

Today, Environment Texas' Kern Williams delivered the following comments to the San Antonio city council in support of proposed, higher fees for stormwater:

"We support this increase in the city's stormwater utility fee. It pays for essential drainage infrastructure for the city. The fee is also valuable because it's calculated on a property's impervious cover. Properties with more impervious cover pay higher fees. This is fair, because more impervious cover produces more stormwater runoff that flows into the city's stormwater drainage system. Properties that create more work for the system should pay more to support it.

News Release | Environment Texas

San Antonio places 2nd in new Texas stormwater survey

SAN ANTONIO — Hurricane Harvey has shown the need for better stormwater strategies in Texas, and one of the most promising is green infrastructure. Environment Texas and Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance today released a new report, Texas Stormwater Scorecard, that ranks the state’s five biggest cities on their support for green infrastructure. While San Antonio placed second, its score of 65% shows that the city can improve its policies.

Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Texas Stormwater Scorecard

Rain is one of Texas’s greatest resources, but it also causes some of our most serious problems. Too much produces flooding and erosion, too little produces droughts and aquifer depletion, and dirty runoff produces water pollution. These problems are becoming worse as more of the state’s land is covered with buildings and roads that prevent rain from soaking into the ground where it falls. That’s why more Texans are using building and landscaping features that can retain and reuse stormwater onsite. These features include rain gardens, green roofs, permeable pavement, and rain cisterns, and are known as Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) and Low Impact Development (LID).

News Release | Environment Texas

Harvey likely caused millions of gallons of sewage overflows in Houston

At least 12 sewage overflows in the Houston area have been reported since Hurricane Harvey hit, according to Environment Texas, a statewide nonprofit advocacy group. Volume amounts have yet to reported. But given that up to 2 million gallons of sewage have been released in previous storms with only 10 inches of rain or less, Hurricane Harvey’s much higher rainfall amounts should be expected to cause millions of gallons in sewage overflows.

News Release | Environment Texas

Austin council approves green infrastructure resolution

AUSTIN — The Austin City Council on Thursday unanimously passed a resolution that calls for the development of an integrated green infrastructure plan. The resolution specifically endorses the use of Green Stormwater Infrastructure features such as rain gardens, green roofs, permeable pavements, and rain harvesting systems in order to address the problems created by urban runoff.

Headline

Get the lead out (of water) in Texas

After nearly three years of grappling with contaminated drinking water, the residents of Flint, Michigan, finally obtained some relief as a federal court approved a settlement last week mandating replacement of lead pipes. However, lead in drinking water is not unique to Flint, and we must confront the sobering need to “get the lead out” here in Texas as well.

News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Trump signs dirty water executive order

“President Trump's order turns the mission of the Environmental Protection Agency on its head: Instead of protecting the drinking water sources for 1 in 3 Americans, he is telling the EPA to stop protecting these waters from polluters. It defies common sense, sound science and the will of the American people,” Luke Metzger, Environment Texas

Report | Environment Texas

Get the Lead Out

Our children need safe drinking water – especially at school where they go to learn and play each day.  Unfortunately, lead is contaminating drinking water at schools and pre-schools across the country.  As our report shows, states are so far failing to make the grade when it comes to keeping lead out of drinking water at school.  Instead of waiting for more testing, we need to proactively remove the lead pipes and plumbing at the root of this toxic hazard for our children.

News Release | Environment Texas

65% of Texas schools which have tested for lead have found unsafe levels

AUSTIN – 65 percent of Texas schools which have tested for lead in drinking water have measured unsafe levels, according to Environment Texas. An analysis by Environment Texas gave Texas a grade of F for failing to prevent children’s drinking water from becoming laced with lead at school.

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