Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Lead testing results

Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Raw Sewage Released by Hurricane Harvey

Reports indicate that flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey spilled at least 31 million gallons of raw sewage in Texas, but likely spilled far more.1 That’s the equivalent of every person in Houston flushing a toilet seven times.* This pollution threatens human health.

Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Get the Lead Out "Back to School" Toolkit

Our children need safe drinking water – especially at school where they go to learn and play each day. Unfortunately, lead is contaminating drinking water at schools and preschools across the country. The problem stems from pipes, plumbing, faucets and fixtures that contain lead. The common-sense solution is to “get the lead out” of schools’ water delivery systems. This “Back to School” toolkit designed to help parents, teachers and school officials get the facts on lead in drinking water and make the case for strong local action to ensure safe drinking water at school.

Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Dealing with Debris From Hurricane Harvey

The floodwaters of Hurricane Harvey have receded, but the work to clean up in the storm’s aftermath has just begun. One thing left in Harvey’s wake is a tremendous amount of debris -- people’s belongings and furniture, parts of buildings, trees, and boats destroyed during the hurricane

Report

FACT SHEET: Environmental and Health Concerns About Oil and Gas Spills After Hurricane Harvey

Texas’ oil and gas regulator, the Railroad Commission of Texas, has received reports of spilled oil, gas, and other fluids from at least 20 locations, involving thousands of barrels of oil and produced water. We may never know the full impacts of these spills, but here’s what we know now.

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