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Austin’s Water Forward plan is a bold step into the future

(By Jennifer Walker and Sharlene Leurig) Austin's new 100-year water plan uses an innovative strategy called integrated water resource management (also known as One Water), which looks at all sources of water — including nontraditional sources like rainwater, storm water, and wastewater — as possible resources to meet community needs. Water Forward is also the first water supply plan in Texas to incorporate climate change into its future projections.

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News Release | Environment Texas

EPA's "Dirty Water Rule" will threaten Texans' drinking water

The Dirty Water Rule would replace the 2015 Clean Water Rule, which restored federal protections to more than 143,000 miles of Texas streams, which help provide drinking water to over 11.5 million Texans. The health of Texas waterways from Rio Grande to the Red River depend on the smaller streams that feed  them, and the wetlands that filter out pollution.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Solar Homes

America has a bold opportunity to speed the transition to a clean energy future by requiring solar power on new homes. Rooftop solar panels save homeowners money – even more so when they are installed during construction.1 Including this common-sense technology on all new homes would help the nation to build an electric grid that’s cleaner, more beneficial for consumers, and more resilient.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Report: Texas should install solar on 3.2 million new homes

AUSTIN -- If builders put solar panels on the 3.2 million new homes and apartment buildings with 280,000 units expected to be built in Texas by 2045, Texas would add a projected 24,719 megawatts (MWs) of solar PV capacity, according to a new report released today by Environment Texas Research & Policy Center.  Such an effort would lead to a ten-fold increase in solar capacity and cut carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation by 3.2% percent by 2045.

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Blog Post

53,000 people ask Whataburger to hold the foam | Luke Metzger

On Nov. 19, Environment Texas joined with Care2.com and the Surfrider Foundation to deliver 53,000 petitions and a letter from conservation leaders to Whataburger's HQ in San Antonio and restaurants in Austin and Corpus Christi. The petitions and letter asked Whataburger to stop its use of polystyrene cups and containers. Polystyrene, commonly known as styrofoam, is one of the worst and most common types of plastic. 70 million plastic foam cups are estimated to be disposed by Americans every day. Most of the waste will spend hundreds and thousands of years sitting in landfills. About one third ends up in the environment, especially our rivers, lakes, and oceans.

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