News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

New study: Solar power delivers more than clean energy to Texas

HOUSTON - Solar panels will help Texas avoid blackouts this summer and provide many other benefits often overlooked by policymakers, according to The True Value of Solar: Measuring The Benefits of Rooftop Solar Power, a new study released today by the Environment Texas Research and Policy Center and Frontier Group. The group used the study to call on the Public Utility Commission of Texas to do more to promote the use of solar. 

News Release | Environment Texas

Environment Texas releases scorecard, calls legislative session a “net positive”

AUSTIN - Ten legislators earned perfect scores on Environment Texas’ biennial scorecard, following a legislative session the group called a “net positive” for the environment. The group heralded victories on air quality, parks and renewable energy, while pointing out losses on water quality and environmental enforcement.  

Happy Sine Die! On this last day of the 86th session of the Texas Legislature, it appears we'll end up with mixed results for the environment. It could have been worse. Polluters have a lot of power in the #txlege, so it's remarkable what was accomplished. Assuming the Governor signs all the bills, this is my read on the highlights and lowlights of session.

19 days left in the Texas legislature

By | Luke Metzger
Executive Director

We're down to less than 19 days left in the Legislative session. Here's where we stand.

News Release

New study ranks El Paso the No. 3 solar city in Texas

AUSTIN – El Paso ranked 3rd in the state for solar energy capacity in the sixth edition of Shining Cities 2019: The Top U.S. Cities for Solar Energy, a new report by Environment Texas Research & Policy Center. The group pointed to a new solar energy bulk purchasing program available through the state and bills in the Legislature as opportunities to further boost the region’s use of solar energy.

Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Shining Cities 2019

Solar power is expanding rapidly. The United States now has over 60 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity installed – enough to power nearly one in every 11 homes in America. Hundreds of thousands of Americans have invested in solar energy and millions more are ready to join them. America’s major cities have played a key role in the clean energy revolution and stand to reap tremendous benefits from solar energy. As population centers, they are major sources of electricity demand and, with millions of rooftops suitable for solar panels, they have the potential to be major sources of clean energy production as well.

News Release | Environment Texas

Houston’s solar energy capacity doubled in 2018

HOUSTON – In a sign of incredible growth for solar energy in Houston, total solar capacity in the city more than doubled in 2018, according to the sixth edition of Shining Cities: The Top U.S. Cities for Solar Energy, a new report by Environment Texas Research & Policy Center. Houston passed Dallas in solar, adding 11.4 megawatts (MW) of solar in 2018. The group pointed to a new solar energy bulk purchasing program available through the state, Houston’s climate action plan, and bills in the Legislature as opportunities to further boost the region’s use of solar energy.

News Release | Environment Texas

New toolkit provides Texas cities with ten ways to go solar

With local municipalities playing an increasingly important role in the clean energy revolution, Environment Texas Research and Policy Center released a new toolkit today to support cities and towns nationwide in capturing more clean renewable energy from the sun. Ten Ways Your Community Can Go Solar offers practical ways to take advantage of millions of available rooftops across the country and in Texas.

Austin students get tutored in solar energy

By

On a recent Saturday at Austin High School, class was held on the roof.

Solar School Tour

By | Emma Pabst
Environment Texas Associate

This past weekend I stood outside of Austin High School, waiting for guests to arrive to our tour of the schools’ rooftop solar installation. I hung our “Go Solar” banner on the closest railing I could find, pulled out the small stack of nametags I’d brought, and looked out over a parking lot packed full of cars that belonged to students and parents attending athletic practices that morning.

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