News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Statement: Ft. Bend county’s W.A. Parish coal plant catches fire

For decades, NRG Energy’s W.A. Parish coal-fired power plant in Fort Bend county has also threatened public health and the natural environment. EPA data identified the plant as the third most heavily polluting plant in the state, emitting almost 10.5 million metric tons of carbon dioxide, 30,000 metric tons of methane and 50,000 metric tons of nitrous oxide. A 2018 study by Dr. Daniel Cohan’s research group in Rice University’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering estimated that Parish is responsible for 177 premature deaths annually.

News Release | Environment Texas

Environment Texas endorses Jay Kleberg for Land Commissioner ahead of Democratic runoff election

Environment Texas announced today its endorsement of Jay Kleberg for Texas Land Commissioner. “Texas needs champions for our environment in every elected office. And as our next Land Commissioner, Jay Kleberg will protect our public lands and help grow our state’s clean energy capacity for the benefit of present and future generations of Texans,” said Executive Director of Environment Texas Luke Metzger. 

To save paradise, stop putting up parking lots

By | Luke Metzger
Executive Director

Dallas officials consider ending minimum parking requirements

Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Electric School Buses and the Grid

Currently, fewer than 1% of the nation’s school buses are powered by electricity, but with advances in electric bus technology, growing understanding of the benefits of electrification, and now a fresh influx of federal money through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, electric school buses are becoming an increasingly viable option for school districts. Electric school bus models are now available to meet every use case, and the number of districts that have committed to electric school bus adoption, or have drawn up plans to do so, is growing. Transitioning to electric school buses would provide numerous benefits to communities and the environment, including improving children’s health and reducing air and noise pollution, as well as reducing the disproportionate burden that this pollution places on underserved communities. 

News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Statement: $60 Million for EV charging in Texas in 2022

AUSTIN, Texas -- The U.S. Department of Transportation announced Thursday that Texas is eligible to receive $60,356,706 for electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure in fiscal year 2022, with $407,774,759 available over the lifetime of Infrastructure law funding. This is the largest sum awarded to any state.

News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Texas legislators and university faculty ask the EPA to strengthen methane regulations

AUSTIN, Texas – A group of 17 Texas senators and representatives and 46 faculty from the University of Texas and Texas A&M University systems sent separate letters to the Environmental Protection Agency on Monday in support of implementing and strengthening the agency’s proposed rule to reduce climate- and health-harming pollution from the oil and natural gas industry. In addition to environmental concerns, both letters cite negative health impacts to the state stemming from methane flaring and a lack of monitoring. 

News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Statement: Railroad Commission doesn't inspire confidence in gas supply winterization effort

The Railroad Commission of Texas, the state’s main regulator of the oil and gas industry, approved Tuesday new critical infrastructure rules to guide the winterization of the gas supply. This comes in response to freeze-offs at gas wells and other parts of the gas supply chain that were key factors in the February black-outs. 

A summer of action

By | Luke Metzger
Executive Director

A few of our favorite photos from this summer

News Release | Environment Texas

STATEMENT: Tropical Storm Nicholas bears down on Texas

AUSTIN, Texas -- For the sixth time in the past three months, a tropical storm or a hurricane is aiming for the now-waterlogged United States’ Gulf Coast. Tropical Storm Nicholas, which is poised to make landfall sometime Monday, would be the first to directly strike Texas in 2021. While Nicholas is unlikely to achieve hurricane status, the National Hurricane Center is warning those in its path of the potential for “life-threatening inundation” by storm surge, with as much as 20 inches of rainfall in some areas causing both that surge and flash flooding. As we saw when Hurricane Ida reached land two weeks ago, these powerful storms can lead to both power outages and industrial accidents. Like Tropical Storm Mindy last week, Nicholas developed close to the Gulf shore, leaving little time for the operators of oil, gas and other dangerous facilities to prepare for the worst. In response, Environment Texas Executive Director Luke Metzger released the following statement:

A climate game plan for Texas

By | Luke Metzger
Executive Director

As America's number 1 polluter, Texas has to be part of the solution

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