Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Solar Homes

America has a bold opportunity to speed the transition to a clean energy future by requiring solar power on new homes. Rooftop solar panels save homeowners money – even more so when they are installed during construction.1 Including this common-sense technology on all new homes would help the nation to build an electric grid that’s cleaner, more beneficial for consumers, and more resilient.

Report | Environment Texas

Environment Texas endorses Water Forward plan for Austin

Environment Texas wants to offer our strong endorsement for the Water Forward plan, and we urge you to vote to approve it. As the Council knows, this plan was developed through collaboration between Austin Water Utility and the Water Forward Task Force. That panel was created by the Council in 2014 in response to a recommendation from a previous panel which included Luke Metzger, the Executive Director of Environment Texas, among its members. Because of this connection, we have closely followed the development of the Water Forward plan and have eagerly awaited its adoption.

Report | Environment Texas Research & Policy Center

The State of Recycling in Texas

Recycling rates in Texas reveal one of the more wasteful states in the nation. At 23 percent, the statewide rate falls almost twelve points below the national average 34.7 percent. Based on the most recent available data, only two of Texas’s major cities, Austin and Plano, exceed the national average.

Report | Environment Texas

Protest of oil drilling at Choke canyon Reservoir

The Center for Biological Diversity, Clean Water Action, Environment Texas, and Sierra Club hereby file this protest of Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) proposed December 5-6, 2018 Competitive Oil and Gas Lease Sale, and Environmental Assessment (EA) DOI-BLM-NM040-2018-0060-EA, pursuant to 43 C.F.R. § 3120.1-3. We formally protest the inclusion of each of the following parcels, including approximately 4,200 acres underlying Choke Canyon Reservoir in McMullen and Live Oak counties in Texas, and over 400 acres in Oklahoma’s Alfalfa, Custer, Dewey, Ellis, Harper, and Woods counties.

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